Homebrew/Homebrew-core community members are invited to take part in the Express 2019 F/OSS-Firms Survey!

Hi everyone

We are looking for participants to help us with a study on the sustainability of free and open source software, ‘Mapping the co-production of digital infrastructure by peer projects and firms’, which is funded by a Sloan and Ford Foundations grant.

We are trying to learn about how commercial firm engagement with F/OSS, for example in the form of paying developers to develop F/OSS, impacts volunteer projects such as Homebrew/Homebrew-core.

Our quantitative survey of GitHub shows that Homebrew/Homebrew-core is one of the top recipients of commits by people with a professional email address (eg @microsoft.com), which is why we are reaching out to members of the Homebrew/Homebrew-core community.

Participation in the survey requires about five minutes of your time (there are only seven questions). If you are involved in Homebrew/Homebrew-core as a developer, maintainer or contributor, please follow the link below to answer our questions:

https://unicanberra.limequery.com/448796?lang=en

The research team: Mathieu O’Neil, University of Canberra; Xiaolan Cai, University of Canberra; Laure Muselli, Telecom Paris; Mahin Raissi, University of Canberra; Stefano Zacchiroli, Universite Paris Diderot / INRIA & former Debian Project Leader

Duration: The survey will run for 2 weeks, from November 25 to December 9 2019.

More information? Please visit our project webpage: https://www.canberra.edu.au/research/faculty-research-centres/nmrc/research/mapping-the-co-production-of-digital-infrastructure-by-peer-projects-and-firms

Any questions? Email: mathieu[dot]oneil[at]canberra[dot]edu[dot]au

This research has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Canberra (Project no. 1865).

There’s a very low/close to zero probability that any of those people actually read the support forum. Maybe making an issue in github will have a higher probability but even as a homebrew maintainer I’d say that it’s practically impossible to reach people that aren’t a homebrew maintainer.